About your Search

20130211
20130219
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30
into words and the the war afghanistan and he's allowing the pentagon and you have to remember when you're looking at the pentagon you are looking at an institution that has defined motor skills and a dinosaur. if you take the pentagon a long time to put something together all but obama has to do and i know it isn't this simple but i would look at the gorbachev experience. he came out of 1985 he gave the secret speech in 1986 denouncing afghanistan to his fellow bureau colleagues as a bleeding wound he had the moxie secretly tell shultz we were getting out that the military was going to get one year to turnaround and the wouldn't feel to. they announced a timetable and they were gone. we need to do something similar. they had their chances we had 11 commanders and afghanistan in 11 years take a look at thomas rex book the generals that devotes a lot of attention to this isn't a war we can be successful and the kind of military we have. there is no military that had ever been successful in the counterinsurgency where they have a sanctuary. not only did it have a sanctuary but in outlinin
serve and the defense policy board of the pentagon as co-chairman of the president's intelligence advisory board, not to mention all the things that have been said about his service in vietnam and his heroism as an enlisted man. so i think -- i understand that people disagree with his position on certain issues and therefore everybody has the right to vote in the way it they say, but the concern that i have is the suggestion that this man who has served his country really since he was a young man and it listed in vietnam is not qualified to be the secretary of defense, i think is just not accurate and reflects certainly a different understanding of his background and his experience that i have. so i intend to vote for him. think he will be an excellent secretary of defense, and the help of we will confirm of. >> thank you, senator. >> thank you, mr. chairman. it think the members of the committee. first, let me say up front that i think all of us deeply respect the senators service to his country in vietnam and service in this body. we know that there are always difficult decision
the war in afghanistan allowing the of pentagon, an institution of the fine motor skills of a dinosaur takes them a long time to put something together for withdrawal. all obama has to do is look at gorbachev. he came 1985, a secret speech 1986 denouncing afghanistan, he had them tell shultz they were getting out and then announce a timetable then were gone. we need to do something similar. he had 11 commanders in 11 years. take a look at the books the general that the votes attention to is this. that is not a war to be successful no military ever successful where they have a sanctuary. not only that but an ally in pakistan to provide billions of dollars of economic aid that makes the picture somewhat confusing how would you disengage from the situation you support vertically integrated criminal enterprise called the of course, i government? but we are finding our way as a resolution, i don't know how many years this will take. my optimism is the team that are too good appointments. wonder why obama wasted time with susan rice who was not qualified if we had somebody like john kerry wh
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
. just this morning, i was over at the pentagon and i took advantage of the opportunity to sit down with the navy's top ship-building official to discuss what the impact of sequestration would be for our naval fleet. well, one example we've already seen. the navy will keep the u.s.s. abraham lincoln, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, in port rather than repairing and deploying it. across the fleet, the navy is being forced to reduce deployments, maintenance and overhauls for critical repairs. when we look at the ship-building budget, it is evident that sequestration and the continuation of a partial year funding resolution known as the continuing resolution would be absolutely devastating for our navy, for shipbuilding and for our skilled industrial base, and that includes bath ironworks in maine which i'm so proud of which builds the best destroyers in the world. and this has consequences, not only for our work force but also for our national security. it's important to note that secretary panetta has made clear that allowing these sweeping cuts to go into effect would be -- quot
that came out recently. it did suggest the pentagon is pushing the pentagon that would only keep 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the process so far, but can you support a plan that was scheduled withdraws troops in advance? you know, we're looking at withdraws troops in afghanistan and according to this article from a passing down to 1000 within a short period of time, i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdraw when sec previously, so much depends on the ground, what the government is doing, what variability eyes up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood with the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. certainly my advice is the commander on the ground or commander central command would provide my advice based upon breaking the security forces are and the conditions in theater and what i think we need to do to move forward to make sure we maintain the
and top pentagon official. in july 2001 he assumed the duties of military assistant to secretary rumsfeld and worked daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years. and then upon retirement from the army he continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense and american security affairs. please join me in welcoming steve bucci. steve? [applause] >> let me add by welcome to all of you -- my welcome to all of you. i think you're going to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i'm a special forces officer by profession, and so this area is near and dear to my heart because this is kind of what we do, or did. they don't let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point, i bought a book that had just been published. it was a two-volume set. it was called "war in the shadows: the guerrilla in history" by robert asprey. that book from 1975 til now really has been the sort of benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that's a l
panetta held what could be his final press conference as head of the pentagon. he announced the creation of a military award called the distinguished warfare metal. the secretary also talked about north korea's nuclear program. the troop drawdown in afghanistan and the series of automatic spending cuts called sequestration. secretary panetta will retire pending the confirmation of defense secretary nominee chuck hagel. [laughter] >> you are on your own, kid. >> good afternoon. as you know, this is i believe my final press conference here at the pentagon briefing room. there are moments when i thought i was part of the last act of an italian opera and i'm not sure exactly when it would end. i think that the congress will act, and that they will confirm chuck hagel this week. what i wanted to do was come down and use this opportunity to first of all thank you all, all of you that are part of the press corps here and the press in general. throughout my 50 years in public service, i have always believed, believed very deeply in the role of the press. because i believe deeply in the role of t
:00 today a secretary of defense. these across-the-board cuts are going to be very difficult. the pentagon needs a leader to oversee and manage historic cuts and ensure they're made in a responsible way. just a minute about senator hagel. he was an enlisted man in the vietnam war. he didn't have to go. he enlisted. the story of senator hagel is not a legend; it's true. he was an heroic warrior, an infantryman. he saved his brother' brother's. when he was a senator -- he saved his brother's life. when he was a senator here, the picture on his wall was of he and his brother in vietnam on a carrier. he's proud of his service. he should be. wounded two times, an infantry squad leader, a man of integrity and dedication. he has a deep understanding of our national security establishment. gained not only from his military service but as a united states no member o senator, meme foreign intelligence committee. he's been a member of the president of the united states's foreign intelligence advise i have board. at a time when america faces so many threats, mr. president, i've outlined just a few of
is confirmed and sworn in." close quote. so if anybody's under any misapprehension, i believe the pentagon press secretary has made that clear, we have a secretary of defense. he has not resigned, and he will continue to serve until such time as his successor is sworn in. and i would just say again to my friend, the senator from illinois, the assistant majority leader, we all know what a filibuster is. a filibuster is designed to kill a nomination or to defeat legislation, as the senator from tennessee said. and i would say this is equivalent to what happened back in 2005, and i have a letter here, mr. president, i'd like to ask unanimous consent to be made part of the record following my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cornyn: and i will refer to it. this is a letter signed by chris dodd, our former colleague who served on the foreign relations committee, and joe biden when he was the ranking member of the foreign relations committee back in 2005. it's entitled "dear democratic colleague, we write to urge you to oppose the cloture on the bolton nomination tonight. w
program that don't work that is 60 percent of what they want to take at of the pentagon and that is government-wide. why would we do that? where is the leadership to say we will get this stopped people who look at this delicate the bad actors for those to make those decisions it to pay the money back. he can defraud the government is doing with impunity. merely not willing or experience to know to hold people accountable for a procurement employee in that is just one example this week. >> what is the business you built? >> my father built the machinery manufacturing business for farming products. i had a plastic lens and a division of that. i lived appear tenures summer's 69 through 2008. the company was sold and parts of it has been sold. portions still exist. >> good morning. thank you. i moved my flight and i will negative to the airport literally after it spent 10 minutes here reading for i will read something quite short on the theory less is more which is what i try tutto my writing students. one of the reasons i am hurtling back to cold philadelphia because i have
, nbc, cbs and abc. the old folks will remember them. [laughter] and oh i should mention the pentagon, the federal communications division, the department of commerce and powerful quarters in the richard nixon white house itself. in a few crowded years tom and his merry band dispatch them all with a competitive open skies policy in place of a post office style communication satellites monopoly. with the first launch of a private commercial satellite in 1974, with the manifesto and government industry accord that laid the groundwork for a cable system that was no longer a long extension cord for broadcast television but instead a robust alternative with hundreds of channels suited every taste and interests. and it would be essential first steps towards today system the universal 24/7 wireless, voice and data communications, practically available to every home, office and handbag on the planet. tom was working in a white house where intellectual bandwidth was appreciated ,-com,-com ma dominated by the likes of henry kissinger, daniel patrick moynihan, george shultz, arthur byrnes, james
, first of all, the pentagon didn't show you any video of things that missed. that's bad pr. and the percentage of weapons that were smart weapons in the first gulf war while infinitely more than anything the iraqis had was remarkably small compared to the impression the pentagon gave in their military briefings where they'd only show pictures of smart bombs and smart missiles and things flying through windows. that was a very, very tiny percentage of the munitions actually expended. so i don't think this was so much a revolution in military affairs so much as a vivid demonstration, as you point out, of just how proficient the united states was in waging war especially against a less proficient adversary. but it also was military affairs in a more philosophical, fundamental way, and that is claus wits still has a vote here, and the ultimate goal of the conflict was a political goal and, therefore, the military planning and the air war being a classic case in point of this were designed with a traditional military conclusion which in truth was not revolutionary at all which w
a vast network of old colleagues throughout the pentagon bureaucracy. is reaching out to them. he deliberately forms a back channel. he cultivates this woman in the white house named meghan o'sullivan who was president bush's chief adviser on iraq in the national security council. he sees she's waving from the policy, he cultivates her. they're talking on the phone practically every day. now, picture this. this is kind of average. his petraeus, a three-star general in fort leavenworth. is talking on the phone everyday with the senior advisor to the president of united states. she will be asking him, general casey who is a four-star general actually commanding troop in iraq if general casey as we only need one more brigade, what do you think with an petraeus would muster these arguments that she could funnel to her seniors on why this really isn't enough. so, you know, when he comes to washington and meets in restaurants -- by the way, this is not, this is strictly professional. can you imagine, this is someone, essentially subverting the chain of command, getting his own views acr
the war in afghanistan and allowing the pentagon with the motor skills of a dinosaur such as a timetable for withdrawal all obama has to do i look at the gorbachev experience, and came in 1985, gave a secret speech 1986 faugh denouncing afghanistan, had told shultz we are getting out with one year to turn around and then announced a timetable then we were gone in 89. we need to do something similar. we had 11 commanders in afghanistan in the 11 years. look at the book if the generals that is not of war where we can be successful. there is no military that is ever successful with a counterinsurgency and they have been ally in pakistan that makes the picture confusing to disengage from a situation where you are supporting perfectly integrated enterprise called the car's side government. but refined doorway with the resolution of crisis but i don't know how many years this will take. >> my optimism that team john kerry and chuck hegel are good a pate -- appointments i wonder why obama wasted time with susan rice when we have somebody like john kerry who was devoted to the position of secret
. the abuse and waste and the fraud is astoppedding. i think the pentagon needs to be paired down. we need the pentagon to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for time so i would, if i could, have the joint chiefs go down the line, quickly, if you can answer with yes or no, whether you agree with the general characterization that the senator made. that'd be great. [laughter] >> let me try it. it's a good question. it's a fair question. i don't -- i can't speak for senator hagel, but my interpretation of that is that it is along the lines of something that secretary gates used to say which was that we had accumulated over the decade post-9/11 when our budget was just kept going up over year, and i said this in lo gist ticks. when the budget goes up year in and year out, it's fair to say that when you had a management problem, all of our managers, they -- it was easy to reach for more money to solve your managing problem, whether it's a technical program or problem or something like that. it was noticeable as secretary in logistics that in some places that having had accumulated ov
it through the bureaucracies of the pentagon. america needs chuck as our secretary of defense to bring our troops home and keep our military the strongest in the world. sergeant hagel was an american hero. when so many americans were dodging the draft he volunteered to serve in vietnam. the draft board gave him the option to return to college but chuck refused. he said i think the best thing for me is to go in the army. it may not be the best thing for the army but i think that's the way to get all this straightened out. yfsz the oldest of four boys, he said, my sphawr passed away and i just was not coming together the way i should. there was a war going on in vietnam, i felt a sense of some responsibility so i said no, i think it's time to go. and so i volunteered for the draft. went in the army and celebrated my 21st birthday in white sands missile range. and chuck didn't serve in a safe bullet. when assigned to germany he volunteered for vietnam and saw the horrors of war as an infrant fantdry sergeant. he hand his brother tom are the only known american brothers to serve side by side i
the pentagon press corps for an award called the distinguished medal. he also addressed north korea's's nuclear program and the troops withdraw and afghanistan and sequestration. >> as you know, this is i believe my final press conference here at the pentagon briefing room. there are moments when i thought it was the last act of an italian opera. i'm not sure exactly when it would end and the fat lady would sing. but i think that the congress will act and they will confirm chuck hagel this week. so what i wanted to do is to use this opportunity to first of all thank you all, all of you that are part of the press corps here and the press in general. throughout my 50 years in public service, i have always believed very deeply in the role of the press. because i believe deeply in the role of the american people in our democracy, the information is the key to an informed electorate. while we may or may not agree with every story in the grand scheme of things, because of the work of the press i believe the truth always comes out. and in the end, we cannot really serve the american people well unless
and a half years, and then upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon is deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense, and america security affairs but please join me in welcoming steve bucci. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of you. i think you're going to have a real treat this morning, as john mentioned him on a special forces officer by profession, and so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do. they don't let me do it anymore. i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact, and that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published, a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows, the guerrilla in history. that book from 1975 intel now, really has been sort of benchmark for this kind of historical review of the subject area. that's a long time for a book to keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think his book is being replaced now, and max has done that with this book which is on sale outside, "invisible armies," he i think you set a new benchmark for the subj
wasn't just sitting in leavenworth, she had a network of old colleagues for the pentagon bureaucracy he's reaching out to them he cultivates this woman in the white house named megan sullivan whose president bush's chief adviser on iraq and the national security council. he sees that she is kind of labor and on the existing policy and cultivates. he's a three-star general from fort leave
bush, to the pentagon to the secretary of defense to some of the support and it's an eyebrow so that basically by the time petraeus becomes the top commander, everything is all lined up. it's lined up so that he can go in and impose the strategy that he wants to impose in the united states government this isn't a coincidence. it's been very exquisitely coordinated. >> you can watch this and other programs online at book tv. >> up next on book tv, samuel argues if our elected leaders do not find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. >> coming to speak at the heritage foundation today it is a great privilege to be here. i've always been a great admirer of heritage and the council in many cases the friendship of many people at heritage for a long time. i admire your the way that heritage works across the policy areas so that you really do here and the integrated message not least among which i think is the attention of the heri
. he had a vast network of old colleagues at the pentagon yurok receipt. .. when it comes to washington elite -- this is not a paula broad we were situation, this is strictly professional. can you imagine -- essentially subverting the chain of command. always kind of been a off the reservation guy. had gone his own way in doing what was necessary. in leavenworth, dug what needs to be done. at the same time, there's a civilian analyst who used to teach hoyt at west point, named fred kagan, who has written a study advocating the surge. petraeus and
be found throughout physician contractor form. the pentagon as the government's as the government's largest buyer and many contractors rely on the government for their business. we are concerned that the tube .0 version of dod's that are buying power turns away from the fixed-price contract. congress is not one-size-fits-all but losing billions of dollars should be sufficient incentive to control costs. the national nuclear security administration's nuclear weapons laboratories and production plants are operated by private corporations. these government-owned contracts have in some cases increased with inflated overhead cost security breaches and construction cost overruns. on the positive side lawmakers appear ready to uphold the cmr project at los alamos laboratory. acquisition is a major challenge across federal agencies as evidenced by the failures of future combat systems deep water deep water and others. a common thread is the use of lead system integrators. for the governor i saw contractor to get signed it made its neat. i've never yet found a contractocontracto r who was not watch
't really know it until i did that. half of the cuts would come from the pentagon and the other half from non-defense discretionary programs. today representatives of the defense contractors educational institutions and other groups held a news conference to call on congress to come up with an alternative to the automatic cuts. >> welcome and good morning everyone. i am at emily and i'm the executive director of the coalition for health funding and the cochair of and dd united representing the full breadth of interest in non-defense discretionary programs. and dd programs are core government functions provided for the benefit of all including public health and safety, law enforcement, education and job training, veterans services, medical and scientific research, weather monitoring and environmental protection, natural resources, housing and social services and transportation and infrastructure. ndd is pleased and honored to join with the aerospacaerospac e industries association and its unprecedented effort to stop sequestration and find a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does
. the pentagon budget is expected to be cut to $47 billion over the past month. it is argued that these budget cuts would hurt military readiness. secretary ashton carter, and representatives of each branch of the military have testified. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the impact of sequestration and a full year of continuing resolution on the department of defense. we welcome the deputy secretary of defense, ashton carter, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey, who is accompanied by with the following friends. robert hale, chief of staff of the army, general ray odierno, vice chief of operations, mark ferguson, and general james amos, chief of staff of the air force general mark welch and chief of the national guard bureau, general frank grabs. i would like to stop by thanking all of you. please convey our thanks to the soldiers, airmen and marines at home and in harms way around the globe. they and their families deserve our utmost support. some members of congress an
at the pentagon and intelligence advisory board, chuck hagel is uniquely qualified to meet challenges of defense and effort he put into the record many statements in support of senator hagel. this is what he says relative to a rant. iran poses a significant threat. >> please take your conversations outside the chamber. senate will proceed. >> no one talks about position on iran. poses a significant threat to the united states and interest in the region and globally. iran pursues an illicit nuclear program with the threats to provoke a regional arms race. and is fully committed to the quote preventing iran from obtaining new layer but then to achieve that goal and relative to israel, he's a strong supporter of israel, deputy minister he is a good friend of israel and in the word of dna alone says he believes and is not talking a senator hagel in the natural partnership between israel and the united states as part of the volume of defense relations between israel and the united states, which are so important to both countries. now the only question is what we're voting on. what we are voting on he
security. the budget cuts known as sequestration and the pentagon and veterans were discussed on newsmakers with carol rogers, representative of kentucky on the republican side. saturday, the pb is in savanna georgia for the saturday, booktv is in savanna, georgia. al gore, the future. and at 1:30 p.m., jake tapper on his book the war in afghanistan. the savanna book festival is part of booktv this president day weekend on c-span2. >> former senator chris dodd is now part of the motion picture association of america. from the national press club, this is an hour. >> hello, i am the 106 president of the national press club and we are the world's leading organization for journalists, committed to our future through the programming and including events like this while fostering a free press worldwide. please visit our website at www.press.org. donate to a program offered to the public through the national press club journalism institute, visit press.org/institute. on behalf of our members worldwide, i would like to welcome our speaker. those of you who are attending today's event as well. our
as sequestration in the pentagon and veterans. watch him on sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> saturday, but tv isn't savanna, georgia, for live coverage of the savanna, georgia but best of all. joining us will be al gore. and heidi kraft on her book, lessons i learned in a combat hospital. jerry wells asks why. the book festival is part of presidents day weekend coverage. >> the committee will come to order. the purpose of this hearing is to examine the efficiency of the department of homeland security and how likely they are spending taxpayer dollars. let me begin by extending a warm welcome to members of the subcommittee. i'm looking forward to working with ranking member ron barber and we share a strong commitment to support that we need to protect the homeland. we attended the dedication ceremony of the brian terry port of call center. i look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of homeland security as efficient and effective as possible. i would like to introduce our freshman majority members. today we have mr. keith rothfus, mr. richard hud
, but also look at the ongoing waste, fraud and abuse over at the pentagon. i can't figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item cannot be audited. we can get to know where the money and tax dollars are going and adequately set priorities. let me ask you about the cbo report on the american recovery and reinvestment not. i'd like to just ask you this, director. can you explain our targeted investment in the american people in our nation's critical infrastructure, high that created jobs and help to begin to grow the economy and also if we invested in a program to provide a coordinated benefits and social services that listed long-term economic stability and income, half of families in poverty, what impact would that be and what impact would that have in terms of our economic growth? >> congresswoman, as you know, we've estimate it consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with economic circumstances the country phase increased output and jobs relative to what would've happened in the absence of the recovery act an
on that "washington post" article that came out recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that we keep on about 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the planning process thus far, but can you supported plan that would scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? you know, we are looking at withdrawal of troops in afghanistan, and according to this article from about 8000 down to 1000 within a very short period of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends upon conditions on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood what the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. and i certainly, my advice as a commander on the ground or commander of central command, i would provide my advice based upon where i think the security forces are, a
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30